Anglo-American University introduced new series of RESEARCH & CREATIVE COFFEES which are aimed to be a platform for discussions about publications, projects and working papers of AAU Faculty as well as AAU students.

In the 2018 Fall semester we have planned 4 events, always on Friday starting 9.30am in room 1.33 on the following dates: September 14, October 19, November 23 and December 7. The second session is planned for Friday October 19 starting 9.30am in room 1.33 and will be devoted to two research papers:

PAPER 1(start 9.30am): Andrew L. Giarelli, Ph.D.:  From Murder to Miscegenation: Mark Twain’s Nevada Newspaper Hoaxes as 19th century ‘Fake News’, abstract is below

With external discussant: Kryštof Kozák, Ph.D. – Head of the Department of North American Studies, Faculty of Social Sciences, Charles University

PAPER 2 (start 10.15am): Prof. Eva Eckert, Ph.D.:  Letters sustaining cross-atlantic migrations: From Frenštát, Moravia to Frenstat, Texas in the decades following the Civil War, abstract is below

With external discussant: doc. Markéta Křížová, Ph.D. – Centre for Ibero-American Studies, Faculty of Arts, Charles University

Registration is needed at this link – registered participants will get the full paper. 

Contact person: Pelin Musil Ayan 

 

Paper 1 (start 9.30am): 

From Murder to Miscegenation: Mark Twain’s Nevada Newspaper Hoaxes as 19th century ‘Fake News’

Andrew L. Giarelli, Ph.D., Anglo-American University

Abstract:

Mark Twain’s eighteen months as a reporter for the Virginia City, Nevada Territorial-Enterprise (1862–64) were marked by a series of hoaxes that tested even Nevada frontier journalism’s loose standards for accuracy. They ended in a complicated, double-barreled hoax with racist overtones and a quick escape to San Francisco. Close study of these hoaxes in their progression reveals Twain at work on multiple narrative frames, twained voices, and meta-plots — the stuff of his later fiction. However, these pieces also reveal how “fake news” is deeply engrained in a tradition of American racism.

Keywords: Clemens, Samuel; fake news; frontier journalism; newspaper hoaxes; Twain, Mark.

Discussant: Kryštof Kozák, Ph.D. – Head of the Department of North American Studies, Faculty of Social Sciences, Charles University

 

Paper 2 (start at 10.15am): 

Letters sustaining cross-atlantic migrations: From Frenštát, Moravia to Frenstat, Texas in the decades following the Civil War

Prof. Eva Eckert, Ph.D., Anglo-American University

Abstract:

Letters and letter writing have played a formative role in the transfer of migrants from country to country and continent to continent, and sustained continuous crossings of the ocean that started in a few Moravian villages and ended in a cluster of Texas settlements. The letters in the current study detail lives of two brothers sharing news generated by daily events of the home town in Moravia, and news of farming and getting adjusted to living in Texas during the transition years of settling down and withstanding the temptation to return in 1874 to 1876 (the dialogue was maintained for twenty-two years). The dialogue is framed not only by the historical situation in Moravia and in Texas affecting migration, as captured in the letters, but also the grief that accompanied the brothers’ parting and despair over the difficulties of acculturation. The dialogue reveals uncertainty of migrating and settling down, intensity of material difficulties that accompany the process, and ways in which letters became the platform to negotiate it. Analysis of the correspondence provided answers to the questions, through what specific knowledge the letters enrich and modify our current representation of migration history to the U.S. in the era of mass migration, and in what ways they once shaped the migration discourse maintained in economically deprived regions of Moravia. The article is intended as the first part of a two-part study. Focus of Part II is the specifics of Texas integration, as documented by narratives in the letters exchanged from the 1870s to the 1890s.

Discussant: doc. Markéta Křížová, Ph.D. – Centre for Ibero-American Studies, Faculty of Arts, Charles University