Prof. Eva Eckert, Ph.D.

Distinguished Senior Lecturer, School of Humanities & Social Sciences , Chair Department of Social Sciences and Languages

Eva Eckert is Professor of Linguistics. Her areas of academic interest include language contact and loss, immigration and immigrant languages, language atrophy, language and disadvantage, migration history, language policy, nation-building, and language ideology.

Eva Eckert earned her Ph.D. in the University of California in Berkeley, her M.A. at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, and her tenure and professorship at Connecticut College where her career developed from 1990 to 2010. At AAU she teaches The Story of Language: Empires, Language and Global English, Intercultural Communication, Language and Power, Psychology: Language and the Mind, and Language Policy at SOH and IRD. She chaired Slavic Studies at Connecticut College for ten years, coordinated the Linguistics program, and developed a Study Away-Teach Away semester in Prague, conducted four times.

She presented papers, organized and chaired panels at the annual conferences of the American Association for Advancement of Slavic Studies, American Association of Teachers of Slavic and East European Languages, and Czechoslovak Society for Arts and Sciences throughout the world. In 2012 she was a Visiting Professor at the Hankuk University for Foreign Studies in Seoul, Korea.

Her books include Stones on the Prairie: Acculturation in America (Slavica Publishers, 2007); Kameny na prérii: Čeští vystěhovalci v Texasu (NLN 2004); and Varieties of Czech: Studies in Czech Sociolinguistics (Rodopi Editions, Amsterdam/ Atlanta, 1993).

Her articles appeared in various Routledge journals, Journal of Slavic Linguistics, Český lid, Dějiny a současnost, etc. She contributed entries to encyclopedias (such as that of Czech language), and edited and co-edited sociolinguistic volumes. Her most recent publications include Changing the Map, Changing Identity: Immigration, Language and Conflicting Ideologies, in Changing World Language Map, Springer (2017); The Power of Language, Learning and Socialization: Romani and Ebonics, Journal of Language, Identity, and Education, Routledge Publ. (in print); Romani in the Czech Sociolinguistic Space and Introduction, in Special Issue of the International Journal of the Sociology of Language 238: Multilingualism and minorities in the Czech sociolinguistic space, eds. Lida Cope &Eva Eckert, Routledge Publ.; Atrofie and Czech Language in the U.S. In Marek Nekula (ed.), Encyklopedie češtiny, Brno: Masaryk University; American Ethnicity and Czech Immigrants’ Integration in Texas: Cemetery Data, Journal Studia Migracyjne-Przeglad Polonijny 4; Language planning for Romani in the Czech Republic, Current Issues in Language Planning 16/1-2, 80-96.

specialization

Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, Immigration, Language Contact, Nationalism and Nation Building, Language Policy and Ideology

courses taught

Language and Power; Psycholinguistics: Language and the Mind; Language Policy; The Story of Language: Empires, Languages and Global English; Intercultural Communication

School of Humanities & Social Sciences, Department of Languages & Intercultural Communication

publications & other activities

  • 2007 Stones on the Prairie: Acculturation in America, Slavica Publishers, Inc., Bloomington
  • 2004 Kameny na prérii: Čeští vystěhovalci v Texasu [Stones on the Prairie: Czech Immigrants in Texas], Nakladatelství Lidové noviny, series Dějiny a současnost [History and the Present], Prague
  • 1993 Varieties of Czech: Studies in Czech Sociolinguistics, editor and author of two chapters, Rodopi Editions, Amsterdam/Atlanta
  • 2017 Changing the Map, Changing Identity: Immigration, Language and Conflicting Ideologies, Changing World Language Map, Springer (accepted) http://changingworldlanguagemap.weebly.com
  • 2016 The Power of Language, Learning and Socialization: Romani and Ebonics, Journal of Language, Identity, and Education, Routledge Publ. (in print)
  • 2016 Romani in the Czech Sociolinguistic Space. Special Issue of the International Journal of the Sociology of Language 238: Multilingualism and minorities in the Czech sociolinguistic space, eds. Lida Cope &Eva Eckert, Routledge Publ., 59-83.
  • 2016 Multilingualism and minorities in the Czech sociolinguistic space: Introduction, Special Issue of the International Journal of the Sociology of Language 238, eds. Lida Cope &Eva Eckert, Routledge Publ., 1-14.
  • 2016 Atrofie. In Marek Nekula (ed.), Encyklopedie češtiny, Brno: Masaryk University, online in 2015.
  • 2016 Czech Language in the U.S. In Marek Nekula (ed.), Encyclopedia of Czech Language, Brno: Masaryk University, online in 2015.
  • 2015 American Ethnicity and Czech Immigrants’ Integration in Texas: Cemetery Data, Journal Studia Migracyjne-Przeglad Polonijny 4
  • 2015 Language planning for Romani in the Czech Republic. Current Issues in Language Planning v. 16/1-2, pp. 80-96.
  • 2013 Review of Francis Rask, Long Road to Victory, Slavic and East European Journal 57.4 (Winter 2013)
  • 2012 Národ a jazyk: Migranti v americké společnosti. Lidé města 14/1, 17-45.
  • 2012 Regionální rozvoj a český národ v Texasu v 19. st. [Regional development and the Czech nation in Texas in the 19th c.], XV. mezinárodní kolokvium o regionálních vědách. Brno: Masaryk University, pp. 224-238. http://is.muni.cz/do/econ/soubory/katedry/kres/4884317/Sbornik2012.pdf
  • 2011 Migration and Memory in Central Europe, East European Studies, East European and Balkan Institute, Center for International Area Studies, Hankuk University of Foreign Studies 28, 209-239.
  • 2010 Language Integration in Texas Czech Newspaper, In Krčmová, M. (ed.), Integration in Languages – Languages in Integration. Prague: Nakladatelství Lidové noviny, 201-215.
  • 2010 Study Abroad Strategies of Language Teaching, American Association of Teachers of Slavic and East European Languages Newsletter
  • 2009 Vernacular Writing and a Sociolinguistic Change in the Texas Czech Community, by Eva Eckert and Kevin Hannan, Journal of Slavic Linguistics, pp. 87-161.
  • 2008 Community “Translation” in the Immigrant Press. In C. Cravens, M. U. Fidler, S. C. Kresin, eds. Between Texts, Languages, and Cultures: A Festschrift for M. H. Heim. Bloomington: Slavica Publ, pp. 81-95.
  • 2008 How Texas Czech immigrants recreated standard Czech, Proceedings of the Czechoslovak Society of Arts and Sciences World Congress, České Budějovice.
  • 2005 Držte se našeho Texasu: Texaští Češi, jazyk a národnost komunity, Dějiny a současnost 9, 28-31.
  • 2003 Life of a Language in Emigration: Taking the National Revival a Step Further, From the Czech Lands to Texas, Linguistics: American Contributions to the 13th International Congress of Slavists in Ljubljana, Slavica Publishers, pp. 37-50.
  • 2002 The Years of Svoboda in the Texas Czech Community. 1880s-WWI, Kosmas: Czechoslovak and Central European Journal, 16.1, Fall, pp. 63-78.
  • 2002 Variabilita, kontakt a rozklad: Jazyk náhrobních nápisů [Variability,contact and shift: Language of tombstone inscriptions], Časopis pro moderní filologii [Journal of Modern Philology], 84, 1.
  • 2002 Language Variation, Contact and Shift in Tombstone Inscriptions, in Where One’s Tongue Rules Well: A Festschrift for Charles E. Townsend, Indiana Slavic Studies vol. 13, Slavica Publishers, pp. 193-213.
  • 2002 From Moravia to Texas: Immigrant Acculturation at the Cemetery, Markers XIX, the Annual Journal of the Association of Gravestone Studies, ed. Richard Meyer, pp. 174-211.
  • 2001 Po stopách českých vystěhovalců do Texasu [In the footsteps of Czech to Texas], Český lid, Academy of Sciences of Czech Republic, pp. 222-264.
  • 2001 Gravestones and the Linguistic Ethnography of Czech-Moravians in Texas, Markers XVIII, 146-190.
  • 1999 Language Variation in an Immigrant Community: Language and Community Maintenance, Brown Slavic Contributions, v. XI: Modern Czech Studies, 11-37
  • 1998 Češi v Texase: moravské komunity a nářečí náhrobních nápisů [Czechs in Texas: Dialects in Tombstone Inscriptions], Naše řeč, Journal of the Institute of Czech Language of the Czech Academy of Sciences, Prague, 81, 1, 38-49.
  • 1996 A Few Remarks on Spoken Czech and Russian, Language and Linguistics, v. III: Papers in Slavonic Linguistics, 73-88.
  • 1991 Prefixed Motion Verbs of Coming and Leaving in Standard and Spoken Czech as Compared to Russian, in Studies in West Slavic and Baltic Linguistics, edited by A.A. Barentsen, 85-105.
  • 1990 Simplification in Transplanted Languages: A Study of Motion Verbs in American Czech, Review of Applied Linguistics, 87-88, 95-119.
  • 1990 Expressing Motion in Spoken Russian and Czech, in Topics in Colloquial Russian, Series XII, Slavic Languages and Literatures, v. 11 (ed. Margaret Mills), Peter Lang, New York, 99-119.
  • 1989 Verbs of Motion in Standard and Spoken Russian and Czech, Russian Language Journal, XLII, pp. 85-107.
  • 1989 Standard and Common Czech: Attitudes and Usage, Bohemia 30, 1, Munich, Germany, pp. 84-94.
  • 1988 First Generation American Czech: A Sociolinguistic Survey, Language Problems and Language Planning, 12, 2, pp. 97-109.
  • 1987 Lexicon of the First Generation American Czechs, Review of Applied Linguistics 76, pp. 25-41.
  • 1985 Aspect in Repetitive Contexts in Russian and Czech, in The Scope of Slavic Aspect, UCLA Slavic Studies no. 12, Slavica Publishers, ed. Michael Flier and Alan Timberlake, pp. 169-180.
  • 1980 Elegies by Jiří Orten, co-translator of a Czech poetry book, Michigan Slavic Publications, Ann Arbor